Guide Services

 

It is my pleasure to make your stay in India as easy and enjoyable as possible.  Aided by a great deal of local knowledge and familiarity with the country, this is usually a simple task for me.

Living and travelling in India since 1997 I am used to the customs and can help you avoid the pitfalls. My suggestions for drivers etc are always with people known to me personally that are reliable and trustworthy.

I am always happy to share what I know with you; from which are what I consider the best shops in Trivandrum and where to get good coffee and dosa in town, to the ‘must see’ sights and destinations of South India and beyond and how best reach them.

I can travel with you on day trips and (commitments permitting) accompany you on longer tours, assuming you are agreeable to taking me as your guest.

Thankful to be the giver, I am reluctant to charge for this services either directly or indirectly. I do though need to find ways to pay for the increasing costs of utilities, maintenance and living expenses and be able to support myself year long from a limited ‘season time’.

If using this service is helpful and useful for you kindly consider reciprocating with a financial donation of your choosing, using your own income as a guideline.

kanyakumari ferry ride

read this Zen story….

The Giver Should Be Thankful

While Seisetsu was the master of Engaku in Kamakura he required larger quarters, since those in which he was teaching were overcrowded. Umezu Seibei, a merchant of Edo, decided to donate five hundred pieces of gold called ryo toward the construction of a larger school. This money he brought to the teacher. Seisetsu said: “All right. I will take it.” Umezu gave Seisetsu the sack of gold, but he was dissatisfied with the attitude of the teacher. One might live a whole year on three ryo, and the merchant had not even been thanked for five hundred.  ”In that sack is five hundred ryo,” hinted Umezu. “You told me that before,” replied Seisetsu.

“Even if I am a wealthy merchant, five hundred ryo is a lot of money,” said Umezu. “Do you want me to thank you for it?” asked Seisetsu.

“You ought to,” replied Uzemu.

“Why should I?” inquired Seisetsu –

“the giver should be thankful.”                                                                   

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